The Islam Migrant Ghettos in Italy

The number of Muslims keeps growing in Italy and the number of areas with high immigrant residents is growing at an alarming rate. This…

The number of Muslims keeps growing in Italy and the number of areas with high immigrant residents is growing at an alarming rate. This has resulted in growing terrorist attacks and the influence of Muslim countries is growing within Italy due to the support given by Muslim nations to spreading Islam by funding Mosques and Imams. The majority of Imams are not European citizens neither do have permanent residency they are granted religious visas and many of whom are on a refugee status in Italy. Migrants can be spotted everywhere in Italy from migrant ghettos to central Milan, Rome or Naples. France has had strict border control and ID checks between the Italy-France border since 2014 and it is in fact a direct violation of European Union freedom of movement and border crossing laws, however many EU member countries have border controls. Personally I have in many times experienced that even a valid EU national identity card is not enough to enter France from Italy but that the border policy always ask to see a passport which is not needed for EU flights except to Ireland.

The Growing Italian Islamization

The numbers of Muslim residents keep growing: There were 600,000 Muslims in Italy in the year 2000, over 1,300,000 in 2009, over 1.5 million in 2013. As of 2020 there are an estimated 2.6 Million muslims.

Foreign Funded Mosques and Imams

The southern island of Sicily is the site of a shining multi-million Euro mega-mosque paid for by Qatar. The Mosque of Rome, which accommodates more than 12,000 people, is one of the largest mosques in Europe, it is there that the imam, an Egyptian Islamist, was suspended after preaching jihad and the building of the mosque was funded by Turkey.

There are now an estimated 1200 mosques in Italy, and 70 % of these are controlled by the Muslim Brotherhood, not to mention thousands of informal Islamic prayer centers and Koranic schools. In Italy, a new Islamic place of worship is established on the average of every four days.

The Italian Terrorist Legacy

Sheikh Abu Iyad is the major Islamist wanted for the terror attack against the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. It was just been discovered that two of his handmen are Sami Essid Ben Khemais and Mehdi Kammoun. They both lived in Italy between Milan and Gallarate and they spent seven years in Italian prisons for terrorism. Italy leads the ranking in Europe as paradise for “martyrs,” imams of hatred and terrorists involved in major terror attacks.

Twenty-nine of the suicide bombers in Iraq and Afghanistan came from Italy.

Eight of the terrorists jailed in Guantanamo Bay are Italians.

Hussien Saber Fadhil, who has been called “the caliph,” is the Iraqi arrested in Venice and considered the Italian link with al Qaeda. He sent money to the Palestinian Arab terror groups as well. The most well known “Italian” terrorist is Abu Farid Al Masri, the suicide bomber who destroyed the United Nations’ building in Baghdad in 2003, killing dozens of civilians.

From Milan came Kamal Morchidi, who blew himself up at the Rashid Hotel in Baghdad, nearly killing then-US undersecretary Paul Wolfowitz.

Anti-Semitism Grows with Muslims

Anti-Semitism grows with more Muslims, the Italian branch of the Muslim Brotherhood released a version of the Koran that contains remarks describing Jews as morally duplicitous and as a people of rejects and swindlers. In several of the footnotes interpreting the text, the commentator, an Italian convert to Islam, suggested Jews are responsible for their own misfortunes and accuses them of being “champions of moral duplicity” who consider as “acceptable any wickedness toward non-Jews.”

Meanwhile, the Italian judges are apologetic about hatred. Ucoii, the largest Islamic organization in Italy, published an ad in many mainstream newspapers titled, “Nazi Bloodshed Yesterday, Israeli Bloodshed Today.” An Italian court ruled that the Nazification of Israel came under “freedom of expression” and was not a case of incitement to hatred.

Attacks on volunteers trying to help ungrateful immigrants:

The Italian union Flai-Cgil has reported that several volunteers at informal migrant settlements around Puglia “were heavily threatened” and were denied the right to help. The Italian union Flai-Cgil has reported that several operators received threats inside a ‘ghetto’ for migrants who work in the fields around the Puglia city of Foggia.
Daniele Iacovelli, the head of the Foggia chapter of the union, said that several volunteers ”were heavily threatened.”

”More than once we were denied the right to help” migrants at the illegal settlement in the countryside between Rignano Garganico and San Severo, he explained. Iacovelli said ”the first threats were made a few weeks ago”.

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